How Much Food in a Share?

Vegetable Yields

The CSA concept enables us to grow the food in the most responsible way, honoring the earth and ourselves. There are about 300 households who are shareholders. An average share is about 19 pounds of vegetables weekly, though it varies with the seasons. This is enough for a family of 4 who wants to eat seasonal and regional food, who emphasizes a vegetable-based diet, and who enjoys preparing fresh foods.

For a single person, a couple, or a family that does not consume as many vegetables, a biweekly share may be adequate.

Shares are further divided into half-year (May through November) and winter (December through April) or full year shares.

The summer shares are freshly harvested every Tuesday and Friday. Weekly shareholders pick up once a week. Biweekly shareholders pick up every other week. In addition to seasonal produce, shares usually include fresh herbs, flowers and extra pick-your-own seasonal bounties.

In 1992 an orchard of fruit trees was planted. Growing fruits biodynamically in the Northeast is extremely challenging. We are excited to be learning and developing this knowledge. Small quantities of Harvestable fruit are part of the share when available.

We also rejoice in the diversity of the winter vegetables available. They include potatoes, onions, garlic, beets, carrots, turnips, celerac, parsnips, rutabagas, sunchokes, oriental radishes and winter squash. Vegetables like leeks, spinach, kale and brussel sprouts are harvested far into December. We also provide our own homemade sauerkraut and freshly ground cornmeal. The winter share is rounded out with fresh salad greens from the greenhouses.

Shareholders who live a distance organize themselves into small groups and alternate in picking up for the others. Our distribution organizers are happy to assist with these arrangements. Please contact Smadar at (908) 362-7486.

The farmers plan for a steady and even supply of vegetables each week. Since there are so many variables in nature, we sometimes have to live with surplus and shortages. Shareholders can preserve, freeze or can the surplus, or leave it on the sharing tables where other shareholders can take it. For some dealing with an abundance of fresh, seasonal vegetables (some of which you may not be familiar with) can be a challenge. We are happy to provide recipes, newsletter articles, and other words of advice to those who need them.